Wednesday, February 6, 2013

RULER deciphered


DECIPHERING:
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Most people, who have tried to decipher the Maalan Aarum, have made the incorrect assumption that the recorded Lenape sounds were error free.  Their task has been made even more difficult by the prevalent academic belief that the Lenape sounds cannot be divided.
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But, by this stanza, I had gained confidence that Sherwin's comparisons were correct.  The Lenape Language was Old Norse.  Truly, someone who spoke Old Norse created the Maalan Aarum.
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Then I hit this stanza!  As fate would have it, I chosen the pictograph for this stanza for the first page of the Frozen Trail to America: Talerman.
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The original words were,
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“Floating up the streams
 in their canoes
Our fathers were rich.
They were in the light,
when they were 
is those Islands.”
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Except for the phrase “Floating UP the streams," the translation looked reasonable   But, when I went through the Old Norse decipherment, the paraphrase of the Lenape/Old Norse words came out to be:
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“You swarm of buzzers,
which little bit 
will you snicker at?
I told you we had
 a ruling priest
in the light 
on the other side.”
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No floating! No streams! No canoes! 
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I could not come up with an over all meaning similar to the original English translation.  The Recorders had written an English version that was not even close to the Lenape words!
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The mismatch of the original English and the recorded Lenape words in this stanza is another indication that the original Maalan Aarum SOUNDS are authentic, but flawed.  
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No intelligent person in the nineteenth century could have devised a Lenape phrase of a “swarm of buzzers” to describe a man in a canoe.
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I rechecked my decipherment.  The first Lenape word is “amok.”   Eleven (11) translators from eleven (11) Lenape tribes reported that “amok” meant, “swarm of bees.”
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[I have not investigated where “running amuck” came from, but “amok” looks like a strong contender.]
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The Recorders apparently did not realize that the sounds that they recorded did not match the pictograph, which was explained to them by the historian using broken English and Lenape "mission" words.  
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The Historian may have said the incorrect words deliberately to inform future readers, who might understand Lenape and English, that the recorded English version was not valid.
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Or the Recorders may have copied those sounds as the Historian expressed his anger over the proposed English explanation of stanza.  Those recorded sounds may have been paired with the pictograph instead of the correct memory stanza.
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WHATEVER HAPPENED
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or why it happened, the recorded words for the this pictograph are very strong evidence that the Recorders were trying to write sounds of a language they did not fully understand. 
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[Sixty years after the recorders wrote down the sounds and the English translation, Lenape students, who knew English, stated that the "Walam Olum" was a Lenape story but the recorded sounds were so flawed they could not understand them and the English translation was not valid.]
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Poor recording of sounds are extremely difficult for someone to understand.  Sherwin’s comparisons of over 30,000 Lenape “words” with over 15,000 Old Norse phrases is a very helpful 
resource.


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